Author Archives: J.W.J. Bowden

About J.W.J. Bowden

My area of academic expertise lies in Canadian political institutions, especially the Crown, political executive, and conventions of Responsible Government; since 2011, I have made a valuable contribution to the scholarship by having been published and cited extensively. I’m also a contributing editor to the Dorchester Review and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Parliamentary and Political Law.

Parliamentary Decorum and How Canadians Perceive Britons


Earlier this year, I noted that the current Speaker of the British House of Commons, Lindsay Hoyle, does not enforce the Standing Orders properly and allows members to address one another in the second person unchecked, with entire flocks of … Continue reading

Posted in Decorum, Parliament | Leave a comment

My Latest Article in the Journal of Parliamentary and Political Law: How Governor General Lord Aberdeen Reinforced the Caretaker Convention and Dismissed Prime Minister Tupper from Office


I first uncovered the correspondence in which Governor General Lord Aberdeen dismissed Prime Minister Sir Charles Tupper from office in July 1896 all the way back in 2012 while conducting research on something else. The documents have proven more fruitful … Continue reading

Posted in Appointment of PM, Caretaker Convention & Government Formation, Confidence Convention, Constitutional Conventions, Crown (Powers and Office), Governor General, Governor's Discretion | 2 Comments

The Canada Day Specials


I’ve compiled a list of my articles and blogposts pertaining to the history of British North America, which you might find of interest this long weekend.

Posted in Dominion Day, History of British North America | 1 Comment

Who Decides What the Constitution Is and Says? Quebec Modifies the Text of the Constitution Act, 1867


Introduction Law 96 has generated controversy and opposition amongst English-speakers in Quebec and, to a lesser extent, in the rest of Canada when the Legislature of Quebec enacted it last week for its provisions on language. But it contains one … Continue reading

Posted in Amending Formulas, Constitution (Written), Indirect Amendment | 2 Comments

The Strange Taboo Against Constitutional Amendment in Canada


Reputedly Unamendable Yet Frequently Amended The Constitution of Canada has gained a reputation for having become unamendable and ossified since 1992 when Canadians rejected the proposed Charlottetown Accord in a country-wide referendum and brought the era mega-constitutional amendment to a … Continue reading

Posted in Amending Formulas, Constitution (Written) | 3 Comments