Author Archives: J.W.J. Bowden

About J.W.J. Bowden

My area of academic expertise lies in Canadian political institutions, especially the Crown, political executive, and conventions of Responsible Government; since 2011, I have made a valuable contribution to the scholarship by having been published and cited extensively. I’m also a contributing editor to the Dorchester Review and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Parliamentary and Political Law.

The Convoy Appeals to the Governor General to Overthrow Responsible Government


If you observe politics closely for somewhere between 10 and 15 years, you see pretty much everything at least once, as narratives and ideas switch parties and cycle through and recycle through yet again, with partisans on all sides remaining … Continue reading

Posted in Appointment of PM, Crown (Powers and Office), Responsible Government | 2 Comments

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee


  The sixth of February 2022 marked the 70th anniversary of Her Majesty’s accession to the throne and thus the Platinum Jubilee of the Queen of Canada. Elizabeth II has become the first Sovereign to attain this milestone, and we … Continue reading

Posted in Documentaries, Reviews and Critiques | 1 Comment

The Disgrace of Boris Johnson


  The British press first reported on allegations on 30 November 2021 that Number 10 Downing Street had held numerous parties and social gatherings in contravention of the lockdowns and restrictions throughout 2020 and 2021. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson … Continue reading

Posted in Parliament | 1 Comment

Consociationalism and Bifurcated Cabinets in Northern Ireland


The dysfunction, conflict, and ideological incoherence at the heart of the Northern Irish Executive offers a modern analogy to what the dual ministries and co-premiership of the Province of Canada might have looked like.

Posted in Comparative, Confirmation Voting | 3 Comments

Orrrrrrrddaaaaa! Speaking in the Second Person


Rhoticity Makes Melody Speakers of the House of Commons of Canada sound so flat when they say, “Order” in our rhotic (pronouncing the ‘r’) North American accents. Australian and British Speakers of the House sound far more comical and entertaining … Continue reading

Posted in Decorum, Parliament | Leave a comment