Category Archives: History of British North America

Dissolution By Demise of the Crown in Canada


Three Ways of Dissolving Parliament In his famous treatise Commentaries on the Laws of England, Blackstone identified that dissolution can occur through one of three ways: “1. By the king’s will […]; 2. By a demise of the crown […]; … Continue reading

Posted in Dissolution, History of British North America | 5 Comments

“Canada’s Legal-Constitutional Continuity, 1791-1867” Published in the Journal of Parliamentary and Political Law


  Some of you might be interested; some of you might not. The JPPL published an updated version of the paper that I first presented back in May 2017 at the Université de Montréal’s “Constitution at 150” conference.

Posted in Articles, History of British North America | 2 Comments

Thomas D’Arcy McGee and the Vice-Royalty of Canada


The Dorchester Review has just published my piece detailing how Thomas D’Arcy McGee advocated between 1858 and 1864 establishing a new branch of the Royal House of Saxe-Cobourg and Gotha in the Kingdom of Canada, with a separate line of … Continue reading

Posted in Articles, Crown (Powers and Office), History of British North America, Succession (Sovereign) | 1 Comment

Thomas D’Arcy McGee on Literature as National Identity


The Dorchester Review will soon publish my piece on Thomas D’Arcy McGee and the Kingdom of Canada. In anticipation of that article, I would like to share with you the section that I had to cut early on in the … Continue reading

Posted in Articles, History of British North America | 1 Comment

Manifest Destiny Hijacks The Monroe Doctrine: A Bill to Annex All of British North America into the United States


Introduction The American Civil War captured the rapt attention of our Fathers of Confederation during the Confederation Debates in 1864 and 1865, and the prospect of another American invasion into Canada (a repeat of the War of 1812), as remote … Continue reading

Posted in Comparative, History of British North America, Monarchism v Republicanism, Parliamentarism v Presidentialism | 2 Comments