Category Archives: Crown (Powers and Office)

An Outbreak of Snap Election Fever During a Pandemic


Whenever Canadian journalists get bored or run out of other things on which to write, they often engage in idle speculation about snap elections. This time John Ivison of The National Post became Patient Zero in this latest strain of … Continue reading

Posted in Dissolution, Fixed-Date Elections | 2 Comments

The Fixed-Date Election Law Forced Saskatchewan’s Upcoming Pandemic Election


Introduction Brian Pallister’s unnecessary early election last year – done ostensibly to prevent an election from occurring during the celebrations of Manitoba’s sesquicentennial in 2020 and to avoid accusations that his government would short-circuit rules against advertising to benefit the … Continue reading

Posted in Crown (Powers and Office), Dissolution, Fixed-Date Elections | 3 Comments

1896: Tupper & Laurier Debate the Role of Governor General and Popular vs Parliamentary Sovereignty


Introduction   On 8 July 1896, Governor General Lord Aberdeen forced Prime Minister Sir Charles Tupper from office by refusing to promulgate his constitutional advice and sign off on Orders-in-Council to summon senators and make other appointments. Tupper sought to fill … Continue reading

Posted in Appointment of PM, Caretaker Convention, Confidence Convention, Constitution (Conventional), Crown (Powers and Office), Dorchester Review, Formation of Governments, History of British North America | 3 Comments

Newfoundland & Labrador Must By Law Hold An Early Election By 2021


Dwight Ball Announces His Intention to Resign as Premier On 17 February 2020, Dwight Ball announced that he would step down as Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador as soon as the Liberal Party of the province chooses its new leader. … Continue reading

Posted in Crown (Powers and Office), Dissolution, Formation of Governments | 1 Comment

Rejecting Constitutional Advice Equals Dismissal from Office: How Governor General Lord Aberdeen Forced Sir Charles Tupper’s Resignation in 1896


When I first embarked on this constitutional odyssey in 2011, I encountered scholars who propagated a novel constitutional interpretation with no basis in history, nor in the principles of Responsible Government itself, which I call “Reserve Powers Without Consequence”: the … Continue reading

Posted in Articles, Caretaker Convention, Dorchester Review, Formation of Governments | 2 Comments