Category Archives: Parliamentarism v Presidentialism

Manifest Destiny Hijacks The Monroe Doctrine: A Bill to Annex All of British North America into the United States


Introduction The American Civil War captured the rapt attention of our Fathers of Confederation during the Confederation Debates in 1864 and 1865, and the prospect of another American invasion into Canada (a repeat of the War of 1812), as remote … Continue reading

Posted in Comparative, History of British North America, Monarchism v Republicanism, Parliamentarism v Presidentialism | 2 Comments

The Constitution of the Confederate States of America Disproves the States’ Rights Narrative & Contains a Parliamentary Twist


During this lockdown and quarantine, I recently re-watched Ken Burns’s epic documentary series on the Civil War, serenaded with the dulcet, non-rhotic tones and mellifluous commentary of the late Shelby Foote. I also read several speeches and essays by one … Continue reading

Posted in Comparative, Parliamentarism v Presidentialism | 4 Comments

The Nature of the “Democratic Deficit” and Executive Federalism in Canada


Introduction The “Democratic Deficit” first referred to a critique from the late 1970s on how the European Economic Community ran its Parliament vis-a-vis its executive-like Commission. Canadian scholars took up the term in the 1980s and applied it here. In … Continue reading

Posted in Parliamentarism v Presidentialism, Responsible Government, Separation of Powers | 1 Comment

A Classical Liberal Defence of Constitutional Monarchy


Introduction: The Strange Americanism of Canadian Libertarians  Since 2011 when I attended one of the Institute for Liberal Studies’ Liberty Summer Seminars (LSS), I’ve noticed that Canadian libertarians often demonstrate a strange American streak, and that their understanding of constitutions and … Continue reading

Posted in Monarchism v Republicanism, Parliamentarism v Presidentialism, Responsible Government, Separation of Powers | 4 Comments

Why The Finance Minister Is the Most Important After the Prime Minister


  Introduction If you asked Canadians, Britons, or Australians which minister is the most important after the prime minister, you would almost invariably get the same answer: the Finance Minister — known as the Chancellor of the Exchequer in the … Continue reading

Posted in Parliamentarism v Presidentialism, Responsible Government, Separation of Powers | 3 Comments