Category Archives: Comparative

Why The Finance Minister Is the Most Important After the Prime Minister


  Introduction If you asked Canadians, Britons, or Australians which minister is the most important after the prime minister, you would almost invariably get the same answer: the Finance Minister — known as the Chancellor of the Exchequer in the … Continue reading

Posted in Parliamentarism v Presidentialism, Responsible Government, Separation of Powers | 3 Comments

A Caretaker Convention in the United States?


This is of interest to me from a comparative perspective. I’m by no means an expert on the current practices in the American system of government. My analytics tell me that Parliamentum does have an appreciable American readership, so I hope that … Continue reading

Posted in Caretaker Convention, Constitution (Conventional), Parliamentarism v Presidentialism | 3 Comments

The People’s Republic of Alberta: Alberta’s Very Unparliamentary Style of Politics


The American Custom of Press Conferences and Opposition Responses Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher once explained to an American audience on C-SPAN what differentiated a Westminster parliamentary system from the American presidential system. At 21 minutes into the interview, … Continue reading

Posted in Loyal Opposition, Parliamentarism v Presidentialism | 2 Comments

The Delegitimation of the Crown of Canada: Paul Heinbecker’s Argument Against Constitutional Monarchy


The Crown Hurts Diplomacy? Paul Heinbecker, a former Canadian diplomat and now the Director of Global Relations at Wilfrid Laurier University, contributed a column to the Globe and Mail entitled “The Monarchy Hurts Canada’s Standing in the World. It’s Time … Continue reading

Posted in Crown (Powers and Office), Monarchism v Republicanism, The Personal Union | 17 Comments

Allegiance to the Queen Means Allegiance to Canada


Permanent residences in Canada must swear or affirm loyalty to the Queen of Canada in order to become naturalized Canadian citizens. Military personnel, parliamentarians, lawyers, judges, and cabinet ministers must swear a similar oath (or make a solemn affirmation) before … Continue reading

Posted in Corporation Sole, Crown (Powers and Office), Monarchism v Republicanism, Oaths of Allegiance | 4 Comments